“There should be no question in the mind of anyone who appreciates a free and open society that Proposition 42 deserves a ‘yes’ vote.”

– Sacramento Bee editorial, March 31, 2014

Prop 42 enshrines local government transparency into our Constitution.

What is Prop 42?

Proposition 42, common sense reform to give taxpayers the right to attend local government meetings and review information about what local governments are doing with our money, will appear on the June 2014 statewide ballot. The measure protects both the Brown Open Meetings Act and the California Public Records Act – the most critical laws in place that protect citizens’ right to know what our government is doing and how it is doing it.

Why do we need to pass Prop 42?

Without Prop 42, Californians will never fully know what’s happening at local governments and agencies, most of which have multi-million dollar budgets. After all the scandals we’ve had in California cities like Bell, where there was widespread abuse of taxpayer dollars, citizens need to have public access to meetings and records.

How does Prop 42 Fix it?

  • Requires local government agencies, including cities, counties, and school districts, to comply with specified state laws providing for public access to meetings of local government bodies and records of government officials.
  • Eliminates requirement that the State reimburse local government agencies for compliance with these specified laws.

Who Supports Prop 42?

California Democratic Party

State Building and Construction Trades

California Professional Firefighters

California Republican Party

League of Women Voters of California

California Newspaper Publishers Association

Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association

California Forward Action Fund

California Nurses Association

See full list of supporters and editorials here.

YES on 42 – Protect the Public’s Right to Know

Proposition 42, common sense reform to give taxpayers the right to attend local government meetings and review information about what local governments are doing with our money, will appear on the June 2014 statewide ballot. The measure protects both the Brown Open Meetings Act and the California Public Records Act – the most critical laws in place that protect citizens’ right to know what our government is doing and how it is doing it.